1. Sedona, Arizona:Sedona is an Arizona desert town near Flagstaff that’s surrounded by red-rock buttes, steep canyon walls and pine forests. It’s noted for its mild climate and vibrant arts community. Uptown Sedona is dense with New Age shops, spas and art galleries. On the town’s outskirts, numerous trailheads access Red Rock State Park, which offers bird-watching, hiking and picnicking spots. Surrounded by 1.8 million acres of national forest land, visitors have instant access to recreational activities. Trails for hiking and biking, along with bouncy jeep tracks, weave among the bristling forest of pinnacles, spires, buttes and domes. Yet, you’re never far from the indulgences of town.Sedona is equal parts rugged, equal parts resort. Regarded by Native Americans as sacred, Sedona continues to be recognized as a place of healing and spiritual renewal. Many come to experience the vortex energy centers of Sedona. Others want to prowl the 40-plus art galleries lining the streets, or to receive soothing treatments from the dozens of spa facilities. Most recently, with its nearby vineyards and tasting rooms, Sedona has emerged as a destination for wine enthusiasts.
  2. Jackson, Wyoming: Jackson is a town in Wyoming’s Jackson Hole valley, home to 3 ski areas: Jackson Hole Mountain Resort, Snow King Mountain Resort and Grand Targhee Resort. The Town Square features arches made of shed antlers from the nearby National Elk Refuge.Jackson Hole was originally populated by indigenous tribes including the Shoshoni, Crow, Blackfoot, Bannock, and Gros Ventre. John Colter entered Jackson Hole during the winter of 1807/1808 during the return journey of the Lewis & Clark expedition. Subsequently, the area became a prime spot for trappers, and many famous mountain men traveled through Jackson Hole in the early 1800s. These mountain men are responsible for many of the names in the valley including Bridger, Jedediah Smith, and Sublette. David “Davey” Jackson gave his name to the valley after a winter spent on the shores of Jackson Lake. As part of the Hayden Expedition of 1871 and 1872, William Henry Jackson took the first photographs of the Teton Mountains and Yellowstone. His photographs, along with the sketches by Tom Moran, were important evidence to convince Congress to protect Yellowstone National Park. Yellowstone became the first National Park in the country in 1872 (18 years before Wyoming was even a state). Grand Teton National Park was created in 1920 and greatly expanded in 1950 through the generous efforts of John D. Rockefeller, who purchased and then donated over 30,000 acres.
  3. St. Augustine, Florida: St. Augustine is a city on the northeast coast of Florida. It lays claim to being the oldest city in the U.S., and is known for its Spanish colonial architecture as well as Atlantic Ocean beaches like sandy St. Augustine Beach and tranquil Crescent Beach. Anastasia State Park is a protected wildlife sanctuary. The Castillo de San Marcos is a 17th-century Spanish stone fortress with views of the St. Augustine Inlet.Its unique scenery and history set this city apart from any other in the country. St. Augustine has a quaint feel but boasts a big appeal. Visitors can see why when they stroll along the brick-lined streets and delight in the city’s European flavor, with centuries-old buildings, horse-drawn carriages, hidden courtyards, and so much more. St. Augustine has plenty of history to explore — more than 450 years of it!In addition to its impressive roster of top-rated hotels, resorts and bed and breakfasts, St. Augustine has become known for its excellent restaurants that serve a variety of dishes reflecting the town’s multicultural heritage. Add to that the city’s world-class art galleries, boutiques and outlet shopping, theater and live music opportunities, and 42 miles of gorgeous beaches, and it’s easy to see why thousands of visitors come here each year.
  4. Nags Head, North Carolina: Nags Head is a beach town on North Carolina’s Outer Banks. It’s known for the towering sand dunes in Jockey’s Ridge State Park. Displays on local flora and fauna dot the park’s boardwalk. Paths through Nags Head Woods Preserve include Roanoke Trail, leading through salt marsh and forest to a quiet beach. South, the top of 1870s Bodie Island Lighthouse offers sweeping views of Cape Hatteras National Seashore.Nags Head is arguably one of the Outer Banks’ most established tourism destinations, and the area remains popular with visitors today for its wealth of amenities, sprawling ocean and soundfront views, and classic Outer Banks style. In Nags Head, a beach-loving vacationer can find virtually anything to make an OBX vacation perfect, including some of the area’s favorite restaurants, natural and historical attractions, and miles of fun. Visitors come here year after year for the fantastic Outer Banks beaches and ample entertainment, and have been doing so for generations. An ideal mix of on-the-beach relaxation and off-the-beach amusements, Nags Head remains one of the Outer Banks’ most loved vacation destinations.
  5. Gulf Shores, Alabama: Gulf Shores is a city on Alabama’s Gulf Coast. Its Gulf State Park has beaches, trails and a pier, plus a golf course and a zip line over the dunes. To the west, sea turtles and migratory birds thrive among the coastal habitats of Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge. Farther west, 19th-century Fort Morgan guards Mobile Bay. The Alabama Gulf Coast Zoo offers hands-on encounters with lemurs, kangaroos and sloths.Adventure, fun, relaxation…you’ll find it all on Alabama’s white-sand beaches. For years, Gulf Shores and Orange Beach remained a little-known vacation treasure, but more and more families are discovering the 32 miles of soft sand and clear waters that lace the edges of Alabama’s southern border to the Gulf of Mexico. With attractions like championship golf, nature trails and water sports, travelers are escaping to the beach for their annual vacations and weekend getaways.Made almost entirely of quartz grains washed down from the Appalachian Mountains thousands of years ago, the white-sand beaches that make up Gulf Shores and Orange Beach shorelines are some of the finest in the world. But, don’t take our word for it. It’s one of the reasons families return to our Gulf Coast beaches, year after year. There’s no better way to unwind from everyday life than spending your days building sandcastles and soaking up the sun. Seagulls singing, waves crashing, children laughing; it’s everything you need to discover a whole new state of relaxation.
  6. Newport, Rhode Island: Newport has a unique combination of qualities that attracts millions from all over the world every year.We have authentic historic sites, fine art and architecture, outstanding yachting, fishing, golfing and beaches, internationally-acclaimed events, spectacular wedding venues, and a charming ocean side location.Newport was one of the largest and most important Colonial seaports in the British Empire before the American Revolution, and is the birthplace of religious freedom.Newport was the first City in World history where all people were allowed to express themselves freely, worship without interference, and governed by an elected, secular government. The King Charles II Charter of 1663, drafted by Newport physician and minister John Clarke, provided the first formal conveyance of these freedoms to the people of a geopolitical entity.Newport is the last intact wooden city in North America, with over 300 buildings dating before the American Revolution. Our Gilded Age mansions are not only a time capsule of a period when America was becoming an economic power, but are a product of the artistic talent of some of the finest architects in American history. For this, in 2007, the US National Park Service recognized Newport as “worthy” of World Heritage designation.
  7. Alexandria Bay, New York: Alexandria Bay is a village in Jefferson County, New York, United States. Alexandria Bay is located in the Thousand Islands region of northern New York. There are many exciting ways to tour the beautiful 1000 Islands from Alexandria Bay. For a bird’s eye view, climb aboard a helicopter or hot air balloon. The many boat tours originating from the waterfront are a great way to get a close-up view of the islands and their sites, including the famous Boldt Castle and Millionaire’s Row. Take a lunch or dinner cruise on a Mississippi-style paddle wheel boat, a narrated excursion on a triple-decker, or hop a shuttle over to the castle.The young and young at heart can indulge in mini-golf, batting cages, go-karts, arcades and a hedgerow maze. See exotic animals and underwater species at two unique permanent exhibits. Water activities include boating, guided fishing charters, and swimming. From Alexandria Bay, there is easy access to municipal golf courses and tennis courts and eight state parks. Dock at The Bay and spend the day!
  8. Stowe, Vermont: Stowe is a town in northern Vermont. It’s overlooked by Mount Mansfield, known for its trails and ski slopes. The Auto Toll Road climbs to the summit ridge. Near the base, Smugglers’ Notch State Park has dense forest and a narrow mountain pass. The Stowe Recreation Path follows the West Branch of the Little River through town, with mountain views. The Vermont Ski and Snowboard Museum exhibits ski gear and artifacts.Stowe, Vermont is a picture-perfect village ringed by storybook alpine scenery. While lovers of quaint will be supremely satisfied, outdoor enthusiasts have hit the jackpot. Stowe’s specialty is active adventure in all seasons, but it soars in winter. If Vermont is New England’s Ivy League of downhill skiing, Stowe is its Harvard.There is no better place to catch a glimpse of Mother Nature’s annual autumn foliage display, as Stowe’s Northern latitude paints a resplendent tableau.In warm weather, hiking, mountain biking and hot air ballooning are some of the ways to enjoy the panorama. With only Providence and Boston able to boast more award-winning restaurants, the food scene is among the most dynamic in New England. Add a free efficient shuttle bus to the mix and a Green Mountain getaway is calling your name.
  9. Cape May, New Jersey: Cape May is a city and seaside resort at the tip of southern New Jersey’s Cape May Peninsula. It’s known for its grand Victorian houses such as the Emlen Physick Estate, now a museum with a preserved interior from the era. Shops and restaurants line the Washington Street Mall, 3 pedestrianized blocks of Washington Street. The Cape May Lighthouse provides views across the Delaware Bay and Atlantic Ocean.Fine wines, outstanding restaurants, classic jazz festivals and special events year ’round. Some things just get better with age, and charming Cape May is no exception. This historic Victorian seaside gem is the oldest resort and one of the most beautiful spots in the country. The entire city is a National Historic District, with nearly 600 preserved Victorian buildings.For a closer view of the gingerbread trim, visit the preserved 1879 Emlen Physick Estate.Trolley tours take in the historic district, as does the popular evening ghost tour. And of course dozens of Victorian B&Bs stand with rocking chairs at the ready.The natural beauty of the southernmost beach in the state has been a draw for centuries. A lovely promenade runs along the sand, perfect for biking or jogging. On Sunset Beach, you can search for Cape May Diamonds (polished quartz that washes up on shore).The pedestrian friendly Washington Street Mall is a hub of shopping activity. For fresh seafood, dine at the Lobster House on Fisherman’s Wharf, overlooking Cape May Harbor.

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