Seven years after visiting Chernobyl for the first time, photographer and filmmaker Arkadiusz Podniesiński went to Fukushima to see how the cleanup process was going and to see how it compared to Chernobyl. Podniesiński notes that the two disasters have a lot in common.

It is not earthquakes or tsunami that are to blame for the disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, but humans,” he says. “The report produced by the Japanese parliamentary committee investigating the disaster leaves no doubt about this. The disaster could have been forseen and prevented. As in the Chernobyl case, it was a human, not technology, that was mainly responsible for the disaster.

Four years after the Fukushima Disaster, “more than 120,000 people are still not able to return to their homes, and many of them are still living in temporary accommodation specially built for them,” says Podniesiński. “As with Chernobyl, some residents defied the order to evacuate and returned to their homes shortly after the disaster. Some never left.”

The area is divided up into three zones: red, orange and green with red being the worst. The levels of radiation are so high in the red zone that it’s uncertain whether residents will ever be able to return. The orange zone is less contaminated but still uninhabitable. There, residents are allowed to return to their homes during the day but are still not allowed to live in them. The green zone is in the final stages of its clean up and residents will soon be able to live there permanently.

The scale of the decontamination work is vast. “Twenty thousand workers are painstakingly cleaning every piece of soil,” says Podniesiński. “They are removing the top, most contaminated layer of soil and putting it into sacks, to be taken to one of several thousand dump sites. The sacks are everywhere. They are becoming a permanent part of the Fukushima landscape.”

The walls and roofs of all of the houses and buildings in the area are being “sprayed and scrubbed” too before residents can return. It’s unclear where the contaminated soil will go. For now, it is being stored on the outskirts of towns in the affected area. Residents are obviously concerned about long-term storage plans for the waste.

Many areas cannot be decontaminated at all because of thick forests or because they are mountainous. Only houses and areas surrounding the houses, and 10-meter strips along the roads, are decontaminated,” says Podniesiński. Residents and scientists are concerned “that any major downpour will wash radioactive isotopes out of the mountainous, forest areas and the inhabited land will become contaminated again. The same is true of fire, which, helped by the wind, can easily carry radioactive isotopes into the nearby towns. These fears are not without foundation, over the last year this has happened at least twice in Chernobyl, he said.

Abandoned vehicles are slowly swallowed up by nature on a stretch of road near the power plant

Some of the cars have entirely disappeared in the wild grass

Podniesinski shows a radiation reading of 6.7 uSv/h

A chained-up motorcycle is slowly absorbed into the field

These contaminated televisions were collected and piled up as part of the cleaning efforts

Cobwebs hang above the scattered products in this abandoned supermarket

Another photo from within a supermarket feels eerily similar to those from post-apocalyptic movies

This abandoned computer lab covered in animal droppings is from a village near the plant

A dining table with portable cookers ready to prepare food looks like it was left in haste

These go-karts have had their last race in an entertainment park located within the 12.5mile exclusion zone

Musical instruments including a piano litter the floor of this classroom

The earthquake which started the tsunami damaged buildings as well

These bicycles were left behind when residents fled

Classes were interrupted mid-lesson by the disaster

An empty arcade, now without patrons

This aerial photo taken by a drone shows one of the dump sites that contain thousands of bags of contaminated soil

Bags of radioactive soil are stacked one on top of the other to save space

Landowners have been told that these contaminated bags will be disposed of, but many people remain skeptical

Cows started to get white spots on their skin soon after the accident. One farmer believes this is due to the cows eating contaminated grass

Nuclear energy is the energy of a bright future” reads the sign

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